Friday, June 27, 2008

AHS meeting news: occipital nerve stimulator research findings


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In contrast to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), the other device being discussed for migraine at the American Headache Society's scientific meeting in Boston this week is significantly more invasive.

Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) involves implanting an electronic device and small wires under the skin at the back of the neck near the occipital nerves.
A battery to power the device is also surgically implanted in the patient's body, usually in the abdomen or buttock. The device sends electrical impulses through the wires to the occipital nerves at the base of the head to interrupt pain signals.

Stimulating Therapy that Hits a Nerve

Kerrie at The Daily Headache was part of a clinical trial in which she had an ONS device implanted into her body. Her experience with the device was not a good one and she had it removed. You can read about her experiences in great detail at her site: Nerve Stimulator Heartbreak.

As I mentioned with respect to the TMS research findings, I have passed along a list of questions about this device to Teri Robert, who is attending the AHS meeting. I will share anything I learn with all of you.

Sources:
Zapping Migraines? Medtronic Begins Occipital Nerve Stimulation Trial
Occipital Nerve Stimulation Study Findings
Can Electricity Block Migraines

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