Friday, July 16, 2010

Do I Regret Trying Botox for Migraine Prevention?


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If you've been reading Somebody Heal Me for quite a while you might remember that I tried Botox injections for migraine prevention. I did two rounds of injections three months apart. I got about two weeks of relief each time. You may be wondering whether I regret trying Botox given the pain and cost (I had to pay out of pocket). I can unequivocally say that I don't regret it one bit.

Needless to say I wish we hadn't spent $2,000 on a treatment that didn't really change anything, but other than that I think it was wise to try the injections. Here's why:

  • Receiving the treatment from a knowledgeable, well trained physician minimized the risks. The neurologist who did my injections learned the protocol he uses from Dr. Roger Cady in Springfield, Mo., a nationally recognized headache expert.

  • While it's true that Botox is poison and the idea of having poison injected into one's face and neck is rather unpleasant, I'm not sure it's much different than taking prescription medications every day. No medication is harmless and there are many unknowns about the newer medications I still have available to try after not having good results with the older preventatives. 

  • Research supports the idea that Botox could be effective for my type of migraine attacks. (Botox May Prevent Some Migraines) My migraines are almost always of an imploding nature. The best way I can describe them is to say they feel like someone is driving a huge spike into my left eye. Some preliminary research determined that people who experience this imploding type of migraine may benefit from Botox injections.
Botox injections were recently approved as a treatment for migraines in the United Kingdom. Hopefully this is a sign the FDA might move in the same direction. Obviously there is no relationship between the two governments that would suggest this, but if the UK found enough evidence to support the treatment I hope the FDA might not be far behind.

Related Posts:
Deciding Whether to Focus on Botox for Migraine Prevention
A Few Words of Caution for Botox Users
Botox Shots May Help Ward Off Migraines
Botulinum Toxin Type A as Migraine Preventative Treatment in Patients Previously Failing Oral Prophylactic Treatment

Botox Works on Muscle Disorders But Not Migraines

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DISCLAIMER: Nothing on this site constitutes medical or legal advice. I am a patient who is engaged and educated and enjoys sharing my experiences and news about migraines, pain and depression. Please consult your own health care providers for advice on your unique situation.