Friday, January 21, 2011

Migraine-Related Lesions Not Linked to Cognitive Problems


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We've known for some time that migraines cause brain damage in the form of lesions, but according to a new study there is reason to believe these lesions are unlikely to damage our cognitive abilities.

Researchers studied the brains of migraineurs ages 65 and older. Their thinking was that if the patients' migraine attacks had caused cognitive damage it would certainly show up in people late into their lives and might not in younger people. They performed cerebral MRIs and cognitive testing on the research subjects and questioned them about their migraine attacks and history. They followed the participants for 10 years.

The MRIs confirmed that the study subjects who had suffered severe headaches were twice as likely as others to have brain lesions. However, the cognitive scores were the same for people who had suffered severe headaches and those who had not. This is clearly encouraging news for all of us living with migraines.

Source:
Migraines and Headaches Pose No Cognitive Risk


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DISCLAIMER: Nothing on this site constitutes medical or legal advice. I am a patient who is engaged and educated and enjoys sharing my experiences and news about migraines, pain and depression. Please consult your own health care providers for advice on your unique situation.